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EMF Study
(Database last updated on Sep 1, 2019)

ID Number 2713
Study Type In Vitro
Model Cellular effects of millimeter waves.
Details

AUTHORS' ABSTRACT: Koyama et al. 2016 (IEEE #6799): Human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) and human lens epithelial (SRA01/04) cells derived from the human eye were exposed to 60 gigahertz (GHz) millimeter-wavelength radiation for 24 h. There was no statistically significant increase in the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells exposed to 60 GHz millimeter-wavelength radiation at 1 mW/cm2 compared with sham-exposed controls and incubator controls. The MN frequency of cells treated with bleomycin for 1 h provided positive controls. The comet assay, used to detect DNA strand breaks, and heat shock protein (Hsp) expression also showed no statistically significant effects of exposure. These results indicate that exposure to millimeter-wavelength radiation has no effect on genotoxicity in human eye cells. AUTHORS' ABSTRACT: Miyakoshi et al. 2019 (IEEE #7087): In the near future, electrification will be introduced to heavy-duty vehicles and passenger cars. However, wireless power transfer (WPT) requires high energy levels, and the suitability of various types of WPT systems must be assessed. This paper describes a method for solving technical and safety issues associated with this technology. We exposed human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells derived from the human eye to 5.8-GHz electromagnetic fields for 24 h. We observed no statistically significant increase in micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells exposed to a 5.8-GHz field at 1 mW/cm2 (the general public level in ICNIRP) relative to sham-exposed or incubator controls. Similarly, DNA strand breaks, and expression of heat shock protein (Hsp) Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90± exhibited no statistically significant effects as a result of exposure. These results indicate that exposure to 5.8-GHz electromagnetic fields at 1 mW/cm2 for 24 h has little or no effect on micronucleus formation, DNA strand breaks, and Hsp expression in human eye cells. AUTHORS' ABSTRACT: Koyama et al. 2019 (IEEE #7285): Millimeter waves are used in various fields, and the risks of this wavelength range for human health must be carefully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effects of millimeter waves on genotoxicity and heat shock protein expression in human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) and human lens epithelial (SRA01/04) cells. We exposed the cells to 40-GHz millimeter waves at 1 mW/cm2 for 24 h. We observed no statistically significant increase in the micronucleus (MN) frequency or the level of DNA strand breaks in cells exposed to 40-GHz millimeter waves relative to sham-exposed and incubator controls. Heat shock protein (Hsp) expression also exhibited no statistically significant response to the 40-GHz exposure. These results indicate that exposure to 40 GHz millimeter waves under these conditions has little or no effect on MN formation, DNA strand breaks, or Hsp expression in HCE-T or SRA01/04 cells.

Findings No Effects
Status Completed With Publication
Principal Investigator Tokyo Metropolitan University - miyakosh@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp
Funding Agency ?????
Country JAPAN
References
  • Koyama, S et al. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health., (2016) 13:802-810
  • Miyakoshi, J et al. IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience., (2019) 18:257-260
  • Miyakoshi, J Chapter 2, pp. 69-88 in Handbook of Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields, (B. Greenebaum and F. Barnes, editors), 4th ed., CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL]., (2019) Chapter 2.:69-88
  • Koyama, S et al. Journal of Radiation Research., (2019) 60:417-423
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